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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
#ConcernsIncinerator - Concerns have been raised over development of Dublin’s Poolbeg incinerator by US waste firm Covanta, writes The Irish Times, following the failure of emissions tests by a Canadian plant built by the company. Covanta last May had to…
Ger Dempsey's SB20 competing in today's Teng Tools Royal Irish Regatta. Scroll down for photo gallery
27 classes competed in today's Teng Tools sponsored Royal Irish Yacht Club Regatta on Dublin Bay. Having just finished the Round Ireland Race on Thursday, the club's own JPK1080 Rockabill VI (Paul O'Higgins) was back on the water again, winning…
Artist's impression of the proposed Dublin Bay bypass as a span across Sandymount towards the M50
#DublinBay - A motorway across Dublin Bay? City councillors are opposed, but State policy may make its construction inevitable, as Louisa McGrath writes in the Dublin Inquirer. Proposals for a new stretch of high-capacity road running across or under Sandymount…
Sailing in Dublin club yachts include a Ruffian keelboat
In a year when sailing will share the limelight with the other sports in the Olympics, the more leisurely and local aspects of the sport received some well-deserved coverage when RTE journalist Marie Louise O'Donnell was recently invited to try…
ICRA Date Clash Prompts New 'King of the Bay' Idea for DMYC Regatta
Radical new ideas are coming to the fore for next month's Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club (DMYC) regatta. The Notice of Race just published outlines a “King of the Bay Challenge” open event. (Downloadable below). In a change from the format over…
The new Dublin Bay 'rock' pictured off Dalkey this week
Last season Dublin Bay sailors hit rocks off Dalkey Island prompting Dublin Bay Sailing Club, the largest leisure users of the bay, to issue a warning over the hazard. Known locally as 'Leac Buidhe', the rocks in Muglins Sound gave some sailors…
In 2015 the SID saw the successful introduction of a new cruising yacht 'Silver Wind' a Sun Odyssey 35
The Sailing In Dublin (SID) Club AGM was held in the National Yacht Club on Thursday 7th April. There were presentations from the Club Chairperson Aine Kennedy and other club officers covering last year’s activities and plans for 2016.  In…
#DublinBay - An independent expert commissioned to evaluate local concerns over the new sea wall in Clontarf has recommended its height be reduced by at least 10 centimetres. As previously reported on Afloat.ie, fears had grown among residents in the…
Today's in harbour dinghy frostbite series run by the Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club (DMYC) was cancelled due to strong winds. Southerly winds, averaging 24kts, gusted to 32kts at race time.
dun_laoghaire_harbour
Despite the modest seascape of the above photograph today's Frostbites in Dun Laoghaire have been cancelled writes Cormac Bradley. The weather station adjacent to where this photo was taken was recording 18 knots of wind with a highest gust of…
The early morning forecast told the waking masses that snow had fallen on high ground overnight and on coming ashore after two races, the hills behind Dun Laoghaire had a light dusting of the white stuff.But for the Fireballs racing…
As the rest of the country deals with the fall out of the flooding, the south east got the best of the measured total sunshine hours yesterday (in hours). 
The Dublin Bay weather buoy is reporting gusts of 60 knots, not far off hurricane strength as Storm Frank intensifies over the Capital's waters this afternoon. Hurriance strength is usually taken to mean winds of greather than or equal to 64…
#Kish50HSSgone - An exhibition in Dun Laoghaire celebrating the Kish Lighthouse 50th anniversary on Dublin Bay is currently on display, however the Stena Line HSS service to Holyhead which was withdrawn only last year has been outlived by the iconic…
#DMYC - The Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club has a busy winter clubhouse programme ahead despite a slow start to the Sunday Frostbite series. The flat calms and full-blown gales that have played havoc with the weekend sailing schedules as…
This afternoon's DMYC dinghy frostbite series has met the same fate as this morning's DBSC Turkey Shoot due to gale force winds on Dublin Bay. Racing continues next Sunday.

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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