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Dublin Port Crane 292: Old Kid Returns On The Block But Modern Container Gantry Cranes Are Kings!

30th September 2017
A regular caller to Dublin Port is the Karin Schepers which last night departed the MTL Terminal (operated by Peel Ports Group). Towering above the containership are giant gantry cranes that have become more prominent throughout the port since the introduction of container transportation from the late 1960's. A regular caller to Dublin Port is the Karin Schepers which last night departed the MTL Terminal (operated by Peel Ports Group). Towering above the containership are giant gantry cranes that have become more prominent throughout the port since the introduction of container transportation from the late 1960's. Photo: JEHAN ASHMORE

#crane292 - It is just days ago that Afloat reported of a 'resurrection' in Dublin Port, that been the return of an iconic 1960's quayside crane 292 albeit relocated to a much more prominent site beside the Port Centre headquarters, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The crane standing 115 feet tall and which has a number, 292, was in use for more than three decades between 1964 and 1997. It's last location in the port was within Alexandra Basin. 

Decommissioning of the crane took place two decades ago, however the crane has has been lovingly restored to its former glory, with an illuminated cabin for powerful night-time impact. Its location is next to the Port Centre on Alexandra Road and close to Point Village and the neighbouring 3 Arena venue.

Crane 292 had loaded and discharged cargoes from numerous ships, such operations involved break-bulk cargoes (i.e. grain). Such cargo handling operations are still in practice but using different machinery. Overall the vast majority of freight is handled through the modern container via i.e. load on /load off (Lo-Lo) gantry cranes. This is where these giant cranes are king! and so are the containers that are hoisted sky-high between ship and shore.

The recent installation of crane 292 is part of the port's efforts of engaging the relationship between the port and the capital, its citizens and visiting tourists alike through a 'softening' of values along its boundaries. This interaction of physical structure and people will culminate when the port's first cruise terminal is built as part of the €230m Alexandra Basin Redevlopment ABR project. The double-cruise berth is part of DPC's a masterplan which sets out its vision for the port's timeframe of 2012-2040.

In addition the crane is symbolic in that it also highlights the port's past but also of current times as the busiest port in the State. In stark contrast to Crane 292 those giant gantry cranes used for containers. They are clearly evident downriver and located on both sides of Liffey channel which becomes broader heading seawards.

A demonstration of such modern crane technology is that pictured above along with Karin Schepers (that departed last night). The  containership was discharged and loaded from the terminal that has three 45 tonne ship-to-shore giant sized gantry cranes. This container facility, Marine Terminals Ltd MTL located on the south bank is operated by the UK owned Peel Ports Group which also operates the Port of Liverpool (see rail story) from where the Antigua flagged containership had sailed from and is a frequent caller to the Irish capital.

In addition to this busy terminal, Dublin Port has a futher two such facilities. They are located on opposite north bank where at Alexandra Basin East is the Ocean Pier terminal operated by Doyle Shipping Group (DSG) and further downriver is the port's third container terminal, Dublin Ferryport Terminals, part of the Irish Continental Group (ICG).

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