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Displaying items by tag: Shannon Estuary

#FoynesJettyProject - The Limerick Leader writes that the name of the successful contractor who will carry out a multi-million upgrade of the east jetty at Foynes will be announced shortly by Shannon Foynes Port Company.

The project, which the SFPC says will cost in excess of €10m, will be the largest single investment at Foynes port since the extension of the west jetty in 1999.

The project is part of the port company's masterplan, Vision 2041, in which it anticipated that the east jetty project would deliver some 150 jobs at the construction stage.

The work on the east jetty is expected to be completed in two phases. To read more about both stage of the project and more click HERE.

 

Published in Shannon Estuary

#ShannonFoynes - The Limerick Leader reports on the Shannon Foynes Port Company's announcement of record profits in 2013.

Ireland's second largest bulk port company declared a 35% increase in its operating profits in the 12 months since its 2012 annual report, a record rise for the fourth successive year.

According to the port's CEO Patrick Keating, this strong performance underlines the objectives of the Vision 2041 master plan for the Shannon Estuary launched last year.

The Limerick Leader has more on the story HERE.

Published in Shannon Estuary

President Michael D Higgins has been in Limerick this week in honour of its status as Ireland's City of Culture 2014. In addition to other events, a highlight was his award of the Freedom of Limerick, something very special to him as he was born in the Shannonside port.

Ireland's Head of State is keenly aware of the Shannon and Limerick's rich maritime heritage, and he and his party spent almost an hour visiting the "Naumachia in the Cathedral", the exhibition in St Mary's Cathedral of the CityOne sailing dinghies built by trainees with the Ilen Boatbuilding School in the city.

The Ilen Boatbuilding School has several significant cultural aspects, as it was brought into being by Limerick designer Gary MacMahon and Brother Anthony Keane of Glenstal Abbey initially to teach boat-building skills by restoring the 1926-built 56ft ketch Ilen, which was designed by noted Shannon Estuary ocean voyager and adventurer Conor O'Brien.

But then as the work of the school developed, it took on the project of also building 23ft boats of the traditional Shannon gandelow type, specialized craft which evolved over the centuries to deal with the challenges of using the shallow and muddy waters of the Shannon Estuary with its exceptional tidal range.

higgins2_1.jpg
The President of Ireland is welcomed to the Naumachia in the Cathedral by Brother Anthony Keane of Glenstal Abbey. Also foreground are the Dean of Limerick the Very Reverend Sandra Bragnell, Mrs Sabina Higgins, and Gary MacMahon of Ilen Boatbuilding School.

It was the first time any new gandelows had been built in well over thirty years. This project was then further developed to build the CityOne Sailing Dinghies specifically for Limerick use, the unique design of these boats being drawn by naval architect Theo Rye to a detailed Limerick specification. With the new dinghies planned for completion at the height of Limerick's year as City of Culture, a CityOne International Graphic Arts Competition was also launched to create innovative ideas for the colour layouts on the sails and the hulls of the boats. It attracted 61 entries worldwide, and the four selected designs were from graphic artists in Kenya, Ireland Portugal and Texas.

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Participants in the Ilen School at the Cathedral included (left to right) Robert Smalle. Tony Broe, Liam O'Donoghue, James Madigan (Ilen School Instructor), Michael Grimes and Gary Wilmott.

It was the CityOne dinghies with their striking colour schemes which formed the centrepiece of the Naumachia in the Cathedral. But there were other exhibits linked to the many aspects of the Ilen School's work too, and in addition to meeting the boatbuilders and crews that sail the CityOnes, the President also met the "Gandelow Gang", who are drawn from the Limerick area both to make up the building teams for gandelows and CityOnes alike, and to row the gandelows in competition and traditional boat gatherings at home and abroad.

higgins4_1.jpg
The Presidential party inspect the exhibits detailing the work of the Ilen School

In concluding his speech, the President summed up the mood of the day:

"I very much want to thank everyone involved in staging this exhibition here in this magnificent 12th Century building. What a great tribute it is to those who put all the original stones in place, that there is something new of the human spirit and craft being exhibited here. These boat builders, they are consummate craftsmen.

The international design dimension to the CityOne project is to be highly commended, and it is such a pleasure to be here with you today. I am delighted that the Ilen School project is part of the Limerick City of Culture. Isn't it wonderful that these skills are being passed down and developed, so that more and more people can take part, and for the community to see such inspiring craft?"

higgins5.jpg

The President meets members of the Gandelow Gang and the Ilen Boatbuilding School including (left to right) James Madigan, Michael Grimes, Gary Wilmott and Tony Broe.

Published in Shannon Estuary

#scatteryisland  Brian Ború's 10th century invasion of the monastic settlement of Scattery Island in County Clare and the subsequent killing of the Viking King of Limerick and his two sons will be recreated this weekend.

The Scattery Island Festival, which gets underway tomorrow morning and continues through Sunday, also features guided walks, lectures, music and song, and marine activities celebrating the island's association with St. Senan, the Vikings, Brian Ború, the Spanish Armada and later as a defence outpost for the British.

Uninhabited since 1979, Scattery Island - also known as Inish Cathaigh - is located approximately one mile from Kilrush in the Shannon Estuary and is home to a monastery founded in the early 6th century by St. Senan. The island features the ruins of six churches and one of the highest Round Towers in Ireland at 120 ft. high.

The re-enactment of the raid on the island by Brian Ború and his the Dál Cais army is the main event of the Scattery Island Festival, which is part of the national Brian Boru Programme and coincides with the millennial anniversary of Ború's death at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014.

Academics and historians have for many years argued whether or not Ború broke sanctuary by killing on church land as he sought revenge for the murder by King Ivar of his older brother and King of Munster, Mahon. Most agree however, that the incident consolidated Brian's position as Mahon's successor and helped him in his quest to become High King of Ireland.

Dr. Catherine Swift, Course Director, Irish Studies Mary Immaculate College explained: "The Annals of Inisfallen state that Ímar, king of the foreigners, and his two sons, were killed on Inis Cathaig by Brian, son of Cennétig in 977AD. In an account given in the Annals of Loch Cé meanwhile, Brian sees a vision of St Senán condemning him for breaking sanctuary by killing on church land which is taken to be this incident. Whatever one's opinion is of the manner in which the Norse King was slain, it is clear that his death paved the way for Brian to enjoy unchallenged rule over his home Province of Munster."

Rita McCarthy of the Scattery Island Heritage & Tourism Group said the re-enactment will be the focal point of this year's Festival, the theme of which is 'Invade Scattery'.

Also taking place during the course of the weekend will be a Ceremony of Remembrance for past inhabitants of the island, a Curragh Race, Music and Song with Inis Cathaigh Comhaltas, guided tours of the island by the OPW, talks on Scattery Island's environment and history, a Treasure Hunt for children, and tours to the Napoleonic Battery.

Ms. McCarhy continued: "We are inviting former island inhabitants and anyone with a connection with Scattery or indeed, its rich history to join us this weekend. Last year's inaugural festival, held as part of the Gathering Ireland initiative, proved to be a huge success with more than 5,000 people travelling to the island. This has helped to raise the profile of what has for many years been one of Ireland's least known monastic settlements."

The Scattery Island Festival is part-funded under the Community Tourism Diaspora Fund, operated locally by Clare County Council, IPB and Failte Ireland. For more visit www.brianborumillennium.ie, see Facebook (Scattery Island/Kilrush Gathering), or contact Rita McCarthy of the Scattery Island Heritage and Tourism Group on 087-9731162 / [email protected]

Published in Island News

#cityone – The Ilen School CityOne Design Competition invites designers to submit designs for the sails and hull of a new CityOne performance sailing dinghy. Four of these CityOne dinghies are currently under construction through an innovative social educational programme in Limerick City.

As Afloat reported previously, The CityOne dinghy is a new performance dinghy, developed by the Ilen School and designed by naval architect Theo Rye as a legacy project of Limerick City of Culture 2014.

This exciting and challenging competition is open to all designers and high levels of creative freedom are encouraged for the task of designing a concept for application to the hull and sails.

Submissions must be sent by email to [email protected] There is no entry fee.

Three designs will be chosen by a judging panel and each single participant and group design chosen will receive €500* and enjoy the opportunity of seeing their designs creatively applied to the City One sail and hull before they take to the water for racing on the River Shannon, Limerick. The judging panel may also award additional non-monetary, special mentions.

Closing date for submissions Friday 25th July 2014. More on this on the City One competition page here.

Published in Shannon Estuary

#ScatteryIsland – Brian Ború's 10th century invasion of the monastic settlement of Scattery Island and the subsequent killing of the Viking King of Limerick and his two sons will be recreated in County Clare later this month.

The Scattery Island Festival on July 26th-27th also features guided walks, lectures, music and song, and marine activities celebrating the island's association with St. Senan, the Vikings, Brian Ború, the Spanish Armada and later as a defence outpost for the British.

Uninhabited since 1979, Scattery Island - also known as Inish Cathaigh - is located approximately one mile from Kilrush in the Shannon Estuary and is home to a monastery founded in the early 6th century by St. Senan. The island features the ruins of six churches and one of the highest Round Towers in Ireland at 120 ft. high.

The re-enactment of the raid on the island by Brian Ború and his the Dál Cais army is the main event of the upcoming Scattery Island Festival, which is part of the national Brian Boru Programme and coincides with the millennial anniversary of Ború's death at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014.

Academics and historians have for many years argued whether or not Ború broke sanctuary by killing on church land as he sought revenge for the murder by King Ivar of his older brother and King of Munster, Mahon. Most agree however, that the incident consolidated Brian's position as Mahon's successor and helped him in his quest to become High King of Ireland.

Dr. Catherine Swift, Course Director, Irish Studies Mary Immaculate College explained: "The Annals of Inisfallen state that Ímar, king of the foreigners, and his two sons, were killed on Inis Cathaig by Brian, son of Cennétig in 977AD. In an account given in the Annals of Loch Cé meanwhile, Brian sees a vision of St Senán condemning him for breaking sanctuary by killing on church land which is taken to be this incident. Whatever one's opinion is of the manner in which the Norse King was slain, it is clear that his death paved the way for Brian to enjoy unchallenged rule over his home Province of Munster."

Rita McCarthy of the Scattery Island Heritage & Tourism Group said the re-enactment will be the focal point of this year's Festival, the theme of which is 'Invade Scattery'.

Also taking place during the course of the weekend will be a Ceremony of Remembrance for past inhabitants of the island, a Curragh Race, Music and Song with Inis Cathaigh Comhaltas, guided tours of the island by the OPW, talks on Scattery Island's environment and history, a Treasure Hunt for children, and tours to the Napoleonic Battery.

Ms. McCarhy continued: "We are inviting former island inhabitants and anyone with a connection with Scattery or indeed, its rich history to join us on the weekend of July 26-27th. Last year's inaugural festival, held as part of the Gathering Ireland initiative, proved to be a huge success with more than 5,000 people travelling to the island. This has helped to raise the profile of what has for many years been one of Ireland's least known monastic settlements."

The Scattery Island Festival on July 26th-27th is part-funded under the Community Tourism Diaspora Fund, operated locally by Clare County Council, IPB and Failte Ireland. For more visit www.brianborumillennium.ie, see Facebook (Scattery Island/Kilrush Gathering), or contact Rita McCarthy of the Scattery Island Heritage and Tourism Group on 087-9731162 / [email protected]

Published in Island News

#rdirl – A father and son duo from Listowel in County Kerry are taking on the double-handed challenge in this year's Round Ireland Yacht Race. The pair Derek Dillon and son Conor, a 19–year–old Univesity of Limerick student, will race the family Dehler 34 'Big Deal' that is based on the Shannon Estuary.

The Foynes Yacht Club pairing have been racing together inshore for over  ten years, and have competed at numerous ICRA's, Cork Weeks and Calves Weeks. The pair are sponsored by leading marine supplier, Union Chandlery.

They recently made the move into offshore racing, enjoying recent success in multiple ISORA Qualifying races. 

'We look forward to the competitive adventure associated with doing such an endurance race, double- handed', father Derek told Afloat.ie

The pair also plan to compete in the Volvo Cork Week double-handed and compete fully-crewed in Cork Dry Gin Calves Week, in which they have finished first in class in the past two consecutive years.

Published in Round Ireland

#foynes – At Foynes Yacht Club on the Shannon Estuary this coming bank holiday weekend the Munster Mermaid championships will take place writes Gerry Ryan of Foynes Yacht Club

This event will be run over two days, Saturday and Sunday, and Officer-of-the-day, Liam Madden has two days of spectacular racing planned on the Shannon estuary.

On Saturday two races will take place east of Foynes Island in an Olympic triangular course, and on Sunday one race is scheduled in Foynes harbour, so that the public can view this spectacular sport.

A total of twelve boats will be competing over the two days, with seven coming from the east coast and the remainder from FYC.

Class captain, Darragh McCormack is hoping for magnificent weather and competitive racing for the event.

This year the Mermaid's will be joined by our friend's from Kildysart, will be sailing currachs to Cooleen Point for the festivities. They will also be racing in the harbour as part of the Foynes Irish Coffee festival.

 

Fixtures for the month of June at Foynes: On all Wednesday's in June the summer league will take place. Saturday 14, Foynes to Fenit race. Saturday 21 cruise and Bar-b-que. Saturday 28 Foynes to Cappa.

Published in Mermaid

#shannonestuary – On Sunday last at Foynes Yacht Club on the Shannon Estuary, Commodore's Day was held with a superb turnout of member's and the public to make the day one of the best in the annals of the club writes Gerry Ryan. With the weather extremely windy for the occasion, it did not dampen the proceedings that went underway.

Racing started at 1.45 for all classes with the officer's of the day, John-Joe Buckley and John Conway sending the classes east of the island for racing. The start line was between Barneen Point and Foynes basin town landing position, and the racing finished at the Club line from the west.

Class 1 raced started at the club line and raced up to elbow rock to long rock taking in the 8 metre mark, Cahercon, table rock and Sturamus around the island and finishing at the club line.

Class 2 had a slightly shorter course with them starting at the club line sailing to the elbow rock, long rock, Innismurray, table rock, Sturamus and then back to the finish line.
With a force 5/6 gale force breeze and gusting this certainly tested the boats and sailors for the racing.

The Paddy Reidy Cup was won by Battle with John-Paul Buckley at the helm; second was Darragh McCormack, who skippered Maximus, and third was Hello skippered by Liam Madden.

In Class 2 the trophy was that was raced for was the Thoroughbred trophy sponsored by Nash's Bakery, and this was won by Alpara skipperd by the Commodore James McCormack; second was Pat Finucane on Marengo and third was Brian O'Donnell on Whyte Dolphin.Club Topaz dinghies and kayaks also took to the water under the watchful eye of Simon McGibney and club secretary Elaine O'Mahoney on the ribs.

After the racing the blessing of the boats was administered by Canon O'Keeffe and Fr. Noonan at the marina, and this was followed by a bar-b-que on the club lawn, which culinary chef Timmy Shanahan served up the best of west Limerick beef.
The Commodore thanked all who had helped out with the proceedings on the day and wished everybody the best of luck for the season.

Published in Shannon Estuary

#foynesyachtclub – This coming weekend a flotilla of yachts will sail from Foynes to Limerick city as part of the annual Riverfest celebrations, which is in its tenth year. Some of the yachts will be sailing on Friday, while the remainder will sail up with the tide on Saturday, berthing at Steamboat Quay for an hour before entering Limerick docks, to berth overnight. This has been an annual trip for members of the yacht club.

Published in Shannon Estuary
Page 6 of 15

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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