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Displaying items by tag: Dredging

#Irishports - The Port of Waterford have issued a Marine Notice in recent days to advise all ship owners, shipmasters, agents, fishing vessels, pleasure craft users, seafarers and fishery organisations of a dredging campaign, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The dredging operation along Waterford Estuary began in mid-March and according to the south-east multi-modal Port the campaign will continue until around 6 April.

Carrying out these works is the task of trailing suction hopper dredger Freeway which will conduct dredging activities in the vicinity of Belview Port. The lo-lo facility located downriver of Waterford City is the main port along the estuary.

Freeway is operated by UK firm, Royal Boskalis Westminster based in Hampshire. They are no strangers to these waters having been contracted previously by the port and more recently from the Dublin Port Company. Due to berth capacity constraints the 92m dredger during December had to dock in Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

On this occasion, Freeway's role on Waterford Estuary will include duties carried off Cheekpoint and at the Duncannon Bar located further downriver and beyond where the Passage East ferry links to Ballyhack.

Disposal material from Freeway will take place at an approved site south west of Hook Head. Following such work a bed-levelling campaign will be assigned to the Waterford City based catamaran craft Fastnet Sound.

Published in Irish Ports

The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine has updated local Fingal councillors on its proposals for the dredging of Howth Harbour.

On his Facebook page, Cllr Cian O’Callaghan says the meeting with the department and the Howth Harbour Master on Wednesday (6 March) detailed a plan to dredge five key areas of the harbour, namely:

  • The fishing trawler basin between the West Pier and Middle Pier
  • The approach channel at the mouth of the harbour
  • The marina used by Howth Yacht Club
  • The approach channel to the marina
  • The outer moorings area which is used by the Howth Sailing and Boat Club

This would result in the extraction of 225,000 cubic metres of silt, the equivalent of up to 30,000 lorry loads, says Cllr O’Callaghan.

The detailed plan follows testing of material extracted from the harbour which confirms that while is it contaminated by general harbour activity, it is not considered hazardous.

It is being proposed that the spoil be treated and used to create a 100-metre-wide infill area along the west side of the present West Pier. Plans for the use of this new space have not yet been decided but it is expected there will be a relevant public consultation by year’s end.

Four months ago the tender period closed for engineering services related to these long-awaited dreading works in the North Co Dublin harbour.

Published in Howth YC
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Monday 12 November is the final date for receipt of tenders for engineering services for the long-awaited dredging of Howth Harbour.

Howth Yacht Club Commodore Joe McPeake has confirmed the date after contact with the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.

It is believed that consultants will be appointed within two weeks of tender closing date, and that they will engage with harbour stakeholders early in the new year to discuss issues such as minimising disruption to harbour operations, including the moorings and marina.

While no clear timeframe is available as yet, Commodore McPeake expects the initial stage towards securing licensing and planning permission to take 12 to 15 months, pending any potential challenges.

Following that, dredging works could take up to 18 months to complete, including works at both piers in Howth.

“As soon as the engineers have been appointed we will seek to meet with them to scope out their plan to methodology and review its implications for us,” said Commodore McPeake, who expects to further update Howth Yacht Club members in February.

Published in Howth YC
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#Ports&Shipping - The second largest port in Northern Ireland, Warrenpoint Port, is inviting members of the public and other key stakeholders to comment on proposed changes to how dredged material from the harbour is dealt with.

The Co. Down port currently carries out a major dredging programme every two to five years with material disposed of in the Irish Sea.

However, new plans have been put forward to carry out dredging on a more regular but smaller scale, with material placed at a site in the mouth of Carlingford Lough between Cranfield Point and Greencastle.

Clare Guinness, CEO, Warrenpoint Port said: “In order for the Port to continue to support maritime trade successfully, it must ensure a sufficient water depth is maintained to allow for the safe berthing of vessels, which it does through dredging.

“In anticipation of a rise in trade over the coming years, and to ensure the Port continues to thrive as an economic driver to the local region, a new site for the disposal of dredged material is being proposed within the mouth of Carlingford Lough.

“This is also in line with current thinking that dredged material should be deposited as close as possible to source.

“In our role as a custodian of the marine environment, we want to hear the views of all stakeholders, including members of the public, before any plans are put into action.”

A number of surveys, studies and assessments will be undertaken to determine the suitability of the location between Cranfield Point and Greencastle, including marine ecology and sediment surveys, geophysical surveys, and hydrodynamic and sediment transport modelling.

A public drop-in consultation event will take place at Warrenpoint Town Hall on Wednesday 19th September from 4pm to 7pm. There will be an opportunity to discuss the proposed disposal site and the environmental assessment process with Port staff and its consultants Royal HaskoningDHV.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#DublinBay - The dumping of sewage sludge in deeper waters beyond the Kish Bank “might well serve as a model” for the current dredging of Dublin Port.

In a letter to The Irish Times earlier this week, Cormac F Lowth, a diver and member of the Maritime Institute of Ireland, responds to the claims of Dublin Port Company’s chief regarding the effects of recent dredging operations.

Dublin Port CEO Eamonn O’Reilly defended the dredging operations in the port, citing “the science available to measure its impact” in response to discontent among diving groups over the state of the water in Dublin Bay.

Divers concerned that the dredging is to blame for murky waters, which have seen all planned dives cancelled due to poor visibility, have however “ignored the obvious” and might now look further east for a potential answer to a question that’s left the bay’s crabs and lobsters with ‘an overcoat of silt on their backs’.

Lowth explains that dredging spoil such as that dumped at the Burford Bank at the edge of Dublin Bay contains estuarine mud and fluvial silt that “is not going to remain in toto on the top of this bank”.

“A glance at a tidal atlas for Dublin Bay is enough to convince one that much of anything that gets dumped near the mouth of the bay will get washed back in by the strong tidal currents,” writes Lowth. “This can surely be described as the maritime equivalent of defecating on your own doorstep.”

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

This article was updated on Thursday 17 May to correct an inadvertent misrepresentation of Cormac F Lowth's comments.

Published in Dublin Bay
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#DublinBay - Murky seawater in Dublin Bay should not be blamed on dredging, according to Dublin Port Company’s CEO.

Earlier this week, it emerged that all planned diving excursions in Dublin Bay by Irish Underwater Council members had been cancelled due to poor visibility in the water.

Dive instructor Peader Farrell pointed at dredging works to deepen the channels into Dublin Port for rendering the bay’s waters “filthy brown” and leaving crustaceans “with an overcoat of silt on their backs”.

However, in a letter to The Irish times this morning (Thursday 10 May), Dublin Port Company chief executive Eamonn O’Reilly says that the dredging operations that began last year ‘did not cause any discernible increase in turbidity above recorded background levels’, according to the port’s Annual Environmental Report.

“Dredging has been a feature of operations in Dublin Port since the early 20th century,” said O’Reilly.

“We now have the science available to measure its impact and objectively confirm that dredging in Dublin Port does not damage the environment of Dublin Bay.”

The Irish Times has more HERE.

Published in Dublin Bay
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#DublinBay - All planned diving expeditions in Dublin Bay have been cancelled due to silt from dredging operations clouding the water, it has been claimed.

The Irish Times reports that Irish Underwater Council members have abandoned all scheduled dives, as a result of poor visibility from particles in the water that have also left lobsters and crabs with “an overcoat of silt on their backs”, according to one diver.

Dredging works to allow larger cargo ships and cruise liners to enter Dublin Port began in October last year, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

But this dredging has left the waters of Dublin Bay “filthy brown, somewhere between dark chocolate and milk chocolate,” says diving instructor Peadar Farrell. “None of the local scuba diving clubs have been able to start diving as yet in 2018.”

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Dublin Bay
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Important dredging work at Hafan Pwllheli marina in North Wales has been scheduled for 2018. The plan to dredge the harbour entrance and the main channel to maintain its design depth has already been agreed. Work on clearing the entrance of silt using land-based machinery will start on 9th April. This is expected to take a few weeks.

The following month a tug boat equipped with bed leveling machinery will be employed to remove any bumps in the main channel that runs through the outer harbour. Dredging will then stop over the summer months to minimise disruption to berth holders.

More extensive dredging of the marina basin itself is then planned for October 2018.​ This was last carried out four years ago when 90,000 cubic metres of dredged material were removed from the harbour.

Wil Williams, Hafan Pwllheli Marina Manager said: "We are pleased to report that dredging of the entrance will begin in April, moving on to the channel levelling work in May. This is routine work and part of our ongoing maintenance programme. During the winter months we can get a build up of silt at the entrance and high spots in the channel. This has to be remedied periodically. Once this is complete, the entrance and channel will be returned to the designed depth of 0.5m below Chart Datum, providing excellent access to the marina for most yachts at virtually all states of the tide.

"Later in the year, we will commence work on dredging the inner harbour and marina basin. This is a major undertaking because boats at the marina will have to be moved to alternative pontoons during each phase of the dredging programme. However, we feel this work is important to ensure that our facilities continue to be of the highest standard."

Published in Irish Marinas
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#portofcork - Along the River Lee is where an expected stink is to eminate in the coming days as the Port of Cork dredges the riverbed.

As the Evening Echo writes, every three years the Port of Cork carries out dredging work in the harbour and the quaysides to maintain the shipping channel. The work disturbs the riverbed, dragging up sediment and releasing gases like hydrogen sulphide. While the gases are safe, they are responsible for the eggy smell that could hang over the river in the coming days.

In 2014, Barrack Street, MacCurtain Street, Shandon, North Main Street, Patrick’s Street and Merchant’s Quay were all affected by the smell as a result of dredging. However, it was thought the lack ro rain and warm temperatures exacerbated the situation at that time.

The current dredging scheme is expected to last until the end of October but the city quays portion is planned to be completed by October 9, limiting the smell in the city centre. The Port of Cork said it is taking measures to limit the impact.

For more on the dredging by clicking here. 

Published in Port of Cork
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#ShippingReview - Jehan Ashmore reviews the shipping scene from among the following stories of recent weeks.

‘Safe and sustainable’ marine transport and ‘delivery of emergency management services’ have been made a high level goal in the Department of Transport’s Statement of Strategy 2016-2019

UK shipbuilder Cammell Laird saw profits and sales fall last year – but the shipyard on Merseyside where Irish Ferries flagship Ulysses (currently drydocking) remains upbeat to win more contracts.

Ardmore Shipping Corporation the product/chemical tanker operator which has its Principal Operating Office in Cork City has made several appointments to overseas offices.

To prepare for a hard Brexit, Enterprise Ireland is advising firms here amid growing signs the British government may opt to quit the single market in order to regain full control over immigration.

County councillors from all main parties of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown expressed concern at potential financial liabilities in the transfer of Dún Laoghaire Harbour.

In recent weeks at Rosslare Europort dredger Sospan Dau carried out work within the harbour to remove spoil offshore, benefitting not just ferries but cruiseships and timber trading cargoships.

Arklow Castle was launched in the Netherlands as the third ‘C’ class newbuild of a 10-ship order from ASL. The 5,054dwt cargoship slid into the canal at Ferus Smit shipyard in Westerbroek.

Published in Ports & Shipping
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