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Displaying items by tag: inland waterways

An official key-handover ceremony took place this week in Coosan between the RNLI and the Inland Waterways Association of Ireland (IWAI). The RNLI built the new permanent Lough Ree Lifeboat station and the new Dunrovin IWAI HQ on an IWAI site at Coosan. A portion of the site has been leased by the IWAI for the sole purpose of locating the new permanent lifeboat station on the shores of Lough Ree.

Present at the key handover ceremony was the IWAI President Alan Kelly and Vice-President Kay Baxter to accept the keys on behalf of the association and its members. Also present were the members of the IWAI Dunrovin Development Committee who have worked on this project for the past seven years. Representing the RNLI was Chris Scully RNLI Regional Estates Manager and project lead and RNLI Lifesaving Lead Owen Medland

Dunrovin Development Committee Chair Martin Donnelly in his opening remarks at the ceremony said “Any project of this magnitude is a challenging undertaking but delivering a lifeboat station and a clubhouse, for two charities during a pandemic is a testament to the resilience, determination, and commitment the IWAI and RNLI have to waterways users.

RNLI Regional Estates Manager Chris Scully, IWAI President Alan Kelly (IWAI Kildare), IWAI Vice-President Kay Baxter (IWAI Boyle)RNLI Regional Estates Manager Chris Scully, IWAI President Alan Kelly (IWAI Kildare), IWAI Vice-President Kay Baxter (IWAI Boyle)

Mr. Donnelly added “For the past seven years the IWAI Dunrovin Development Committee has worked voluntarily, despite the challenges, to ensure this joint build was delivered. Without the enormous efforts of the committee and our membership support, this project would never have gotten over the line. We have worked hand in hand with the RNLI team initially from RNLI HQ Poole Dorset and more recently from the Swords RNLI HQ. This work ensures this part of the River Shannon and Lough Ree has a permanent lifeboat station fit for purpose, manned by local volunteers and providing essential rescue services.”

Mr. Donnelly went on to highlight the significance of the project for the wider area “What has been delivered here for both organisations is a vote of confidence in our water-based activities and in the future. With the increasing focus on outdoor activity and the growing love of our environment and waterways, there will be a rise in participation in water sports and an increase in visitor numbers looking to participate in water-based activities. With the new lifeboat station at Coosan, they can feel safe knowing the RNLI is at hand should the need arise. The IWAI as a charity has a strong ethos of delivering for the greater good so this key handover ceremony is a significant occasion for the IWAI Dunrovin Development Committee who delivered handsomely the largest project ever undertaken by the IWAI for the benefit of the whole organisation.”

In handing over the key RNLI Regional Estates Manager Chris Scully said “On behalf of the RNLI and everyone connected with the planning and construction of this permanent Lough Ree Lifeboat Station at Dunrovin, I'd like to thank the IWAI for providing the site for our operations and working so closely with us over the past number of years to bring this build to fruition. The last few years have been particularly challenging for us all and the IWAI support to the RNLI has been welcome and warm. We are proud that following 10 years in a temporary facility, we have delivered a permanent Lifeboat station on Lough Ree, which is purpose-built for our volunteer crews. It is a fitting home, with all the necessary facilities to maintain a professional rescue service for the local community and wider waterways users.”

He continued 'We have a long and proud history of working with the inland waterways and for many years they have generously contributed annually to our fundraising efforts which we hope will continue into the future. The RNLI is independent and depends on voluntary fundraising and donations to maintain its rescue service. This is a special partnership that will continue into the future. In handing over the key, he concluded “Congratulations, it’s time to collect the keys”

In accepting the keys to Dunrovin Alan Kelly IWAI President said “This is a momentous occasion for the IWAI. Dunrovin as a site has been in our ownership for many years. The site was generously bequeathed by Harry and Cynthis Rice whose love of the waterways and place in history as founding members of this organisation is legendary.

The IWAI President continued “While I may have marked the sod-turning virtually, I am honoured to be here physically on the site of our new IWAI HQ for this key handing over ceremony. This is a historical occasion us as we have finally fulfilled our ambition to have a home for the IWAI on the site where the all-Ireland organisation was first conceived. Dunrovin is our spiritual home, and it is fitting that we share this site with the RNLI.”

In referring to the RNLI Mr. Kelly said “Our relationship with the RNLI is a long and close one and I know all water lovers all over Ireland owe a debt of gratitude to them. This strategic partnership has been ably steered by Martin Donnelly and the IWAI Dunrovin Development Committee and I look forward to a long and happy future working together as neighbours as we use this facility for all our activities.

On funding for the build, Mr Kelly acknowledged “Dunrovin would not have been delivered without the unstinting support and financial donations from our IWAI members and branches. We are an all-Ireland organisation and people up and down the country put their hands in their pockets and generously contributed to the build. None of us were in a position to run fundraising events over the past two years and had to rely on our own people to support the project. The appeal was responded to individually and collectively with overwhelming generosity, a testament to the character and strength of this great all Ireland organisation.

We also give thanks to our corporate sponsors who during challenging times supported us and we will certainly acknowledge this support. I can guarantee our members will practically support the sponsorship by doing business with those sponsors. I also acknowledge the generous support of the general public, Westmeath Local Community Development, and Waterways Ireland.”

IWAI Vice President, Kay Baxter said “I know from talking to people there is a real appetite among the members and branches to get out on the water and run events and activities at our new Dunrovin IWAI HQ and I am proud to say that in 2022, after many years they will finally be able to do so. Prior to the strategic partnership with RNLI and the joint development, the site in Coosan was ably looked after by the Dunrovin trustees Michal Martin, Damien Delany, and the IWAI Athlone branch. We owe a debt of gratitude to both for their tireless work over many years, in the background”

Ms. Baxter finished by saying “I can promise you that we will plan a launch event for Dunrovin where we will celebrate the opening of the facility and cut the ribbon and personally thank all those who have supported this project along its journey.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Have you ever wondered how Ireland’s rivers got their names, how the canal network came into being, or what a lockkeeper does? These are just some facets of Ireland’s navigable waterways explored in a new podcast series from Waterways Ireland called “Waterways Through Time”. Presented by historian Turtle Bunbury, the eight-part series takes the listener through the history and archaeology of Ireland’s waterways, including the canal network; how rivers and lakes were named; the archaeological legacy of the Mesolithic; Neolithic and Bronze Age periods; the geological origins of the rivers and lakes and the land through which the canals were cut. Ireland’s early Christian settlements along the inland waterways are also explored. The series also features interviews with lockkeepers on the Barrow navigation, the Shannon, and the Grand Canal.

This is the first podcast series commissioned by Waterways Ireland. It complements other resources in the organisation’s digital archive. Commenting, Chief Executive of Waterways Ireland, John McDonagh said: “Ireland has a rich inland water heritage. Through this series, we are placing this heritage centre stage to perpetuate these unique and inspiring insights. Waterways Ireland has a wonderful digital archive featuring thousands of drawings, sketches, and records of the Irish inland waterways, dating from the 18th century to the present day. The podcast series complements our oral history programme and the ‘Stories from the Waterways’ film series, which are available on the Waterways Ireland website. We encourage people of all ages to listen to these podcasts and to visit our digital archive, which will add to their enjoyment of our waterways.”

Minister for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan TD added: “I would like to commend Waterways Ireland on another wonderful project that captures Ireland’s unique waterways heritage. This series is an important oral history tool that records the guests’ stories and memories and makes them easily accessible to the public.”

The podcast series was developed and presented by well-known historian Turtle Bunbury. He said: “The series contains a mix of stories, historical events and contemporary interviews with people associated with the waterways. This was a fascinating project on which to work. It was truly a pleasure to research and develop it. Chatting to those connected to the waterways and weaving together the various myths, legends and historical facts to tell the stories of the waterways has been a wonderful experience that gives a new perspective on our inland waterway heritage.”

Launched in 2021, the Waterways Ireland digital archive explores more than 200 years of Irish waterways. It contains a range of collections, from engineering maps and drawings, an oral history collection and donated collections of slides, photographs, videos, and documents. It can be found here.

The podcast series is now available on all podcast outlets from late February 2022.

Episode Details:

1. The Flow of Time
An overview of the podcast series, including an introduction to Waterways Ireland and the various rivers, lakes, canals, and navigations that it is entrusted with managing. This episode also provides a potted history of the creation of the canal network in Ireland, explaining how and why they were conceived and how and why the great project failed.
2. Goddesses of the Water
Irish rivers and loughs are named for a deity from the annals of mythology. Most are goddesses of the Tuatha de Danaan. Some are from the Fir Bolg. Others involve the likes of Finn MacCool and the Children of Lir. In this episode Turtle tracks the origin of these names and provides a colourful retelling of the legends associated with Ireland’s original waterways.
3. Of Glaciers and Crannogs
A look at the geological origins of Ireland’s rivers and lakes, and the land through which the canals were cut, as well as the archaeological legacy of the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age periods which gave rise to burial tombs, log-boats, bog-roads and crannogs in and around waterways, such as the Shannon, the Barrow, the Erne and the Bann.
4. Spiritual Waters, Part 1: Saints and Scholars
This episode tracks the early Christian settlement along the River Barrow, and the birth of monastic schools along the Shannon and the Boyne at Clonmacnoise, Clonfert and Clonard.
5. Spiritual Waters, Part 2: Hermits and Island Monasteries
Homing in on some of the 51 island monasteries on Ireland’s inland waterways, such as Lough Erne, Lough Key and Lough Ree, this episode tells the story of some of the hermits and anchorites who lived in such places.
6. The Barrow Interview: John O’Neill
A brief overview of the Barrow Navigation homing in on John O’Neill and his late aunt Maggie Gorman, lockkeepers, as well as the tales of his father rowing across the river to work, and the gimlet used by the Guinness bargemen to tap the casks.
7. The Shannon Interview: Elizabeth Higgins
One of Ireland’s three lady lockkeepers discusses her unusual experiences on the Shannon, with contextual background on the area of the river which she patrols and manages.
8. The Grand Canal Interview: Alan Lindley
A potted history of the Grand Canal and the Barrow Navigation, told through an interview with Alan Lindley, whose family have been on the locks since the canal was constructed in the 1790s.

Published in Inland
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Nichola Mallon MLA, Minister for Infrastructure today (24th November) met with Waterways Ireland CEO John McDonagh at its Headquarters in Enniskillen.

John Mc Donagh briefed Minister Mallon on a range of key projects including the 10-year Strategy and Waterways Ireland’s draft Climate Action Plan which is currently undergoing public consultation.

Waterways Ireland is the custodian of Ireland’s inland navigable waterways and sees climate change as a critical challenge for the organisation and its stakeholders. As the body responsible for vital shared heritage across Ireland and Northern Ireland, there is an opportunity and a responsibility to take a leadership role in climate action. Waterways Ireland has identified transformative and innovative ways to engage in climate action initiatives over the lifetime of the plan to reduce emissions by at least 51% and improve energy efficiency by at least 50%. It also addresses Waterways Ireland’s aim to be a net-zero organisation by 2050.

"Waterways Ireland’s aim is to be a net-zero organisation by 2050"

Under the draft plan, Waterways Ireland commits to considering climate action in decisions around the acquisition, operation, maintenance and disposal of its assets, as well as the procurement of energy, consumables and third-party services. These activities will be supported by targeted actions and initiatives in priority areas to implement climate mitigation and adaptation measures. Progress in achieving key results will be measured quarterly, ensuring that activities are agile and can keep pace with carbon budgets and other measures developed for the sector.

John Mc Donagh Waterways Ireland CEO said “I welcome Minister Mallon to Waterways Ireland, to share our vision & plans for the future We are custodians of the incredible natural and built heritage with which we have been entrusted. Over the next 10 years, we have an ambitious plan to reimagine and develop a sustainable waterway network which contributes significantly to the recreation, social, economic and environmental life in our communities.”

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises the following reopening of facilities will occur on Thursday 03 December 2020.

Navigational Use

  • Shannon Navigation - Locks and Bridges will be open on Winter Hours. Times are available on the Waterways Ireland website. There continues to be no charge for Lock passage.
  • Shannon Navigation - Vessels can avail of the Winter Moorings facility by applying online.
  • Shannon Erne Waterway - Locks will be open, operating Hours - 09:00hrs to 16:00hrs daily.
  • Shannon Navigation & Shannon- Erne Waterway - Waterways Ireland service blocks will re-open (only those that operate all year round)
  • Grand Canal / Royal Canal / Barrow Line & Navigation – Normal winter arrangements will apply.

General Navigation Guidelines

Navigation remains open within your home county until 18 December. From 18th Dec to 6th Jan 2021 the navigation is open outside of your home county.

When on jetties please be aware of other users. Wait or move aside to allow others to pass at a safe distance.

Observe social distancing protocols - keep a distance of at least 2m (6 feet) away from other people;

Be mindful of others and act always with consideration and with respect and observe the leave no trace principles and protect our environment;

Observe all health etiquettes when on the towpaths.

In all instances, social distancing must be maintained keeping your distance from both other people and moored boats. Please refer to your relevant representative body for guidance on the most appropriate health and safety precautions and advice.

Published in Inland Waterways

The Inland Waterways Association of Ireland has cancelled its Council Meeting scheduled for this coming Saturday, March 7th.

IWAI President Alan Kelly has advised that due to the increased risk posed by COVID-19 (Coronavirus) and that cases of Coronavirus have now been
confirmed North, South, East and West it has been decided to cancel the IWAI Council meeting scheduled for this coming Saturday, March 7th.

The IWAI says it is keeping the situation 'under review' and a decision made about the AGM (scheduled for April 25) at a later date.

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A historic railway bridge in south west Wexford, reports New Ross Standard, has raised concern in that the structure which has been out of use for a decade is being left to rot and could eventually fall into the river.

Former Labour county councillor Denis North, who worked for CIE for 45 years, including 13 years operating the bridge, said the central span may fall into the River Barrow in years to come if it isn't maintained and returned to use.

Irish Rail CEO Jim Meade informed Mr North in May that there is no proposal to close the Barrow Bridge.

'The Barrow Bridge operating equipment is very old and requires significant resources to maintain and operate,' Mr Meade wrote.

He said: 'While the railway line is suspended, the focus of operation has been to support the Port of New Ross shipping operations in line with our statutory responsibility for the bridge operation.'

He said: 'In order to ensure the consistent delivery of the required shipping lane access for the Port of New Ross, we have reviewed the operation with the Port of New Ross Chief Executive and our Chief Civil engineer and propose to temporarily secure the bridge in the open position for shipping traffic, to improve the navigation controls and lighting on the bridge to a required standard and to allow the remote monitoring of bridge operations. The effect of this proposed change will ensure the reliability of the operation for maritime navigation and reduce our operations and infrastructure costs in the meantime.'

For more on the story click this link. 

Published in Irish Ports

A new clean-up initiative which involves volunteers kayaking down the river Liffey to pick up rubbish has been launched.

GreenKayak, a Danish non-governmental organisation founded in 2017 by Tobias Weber-Andersen, reports The Irish Times, operates a free service where volunteers sign up to kayak along the river in exchange for picking up litter.

The initiative launched its first Irish venture, in partnership with Dublin’s City Kayaking, on Tuesday. It aims to collect plastic from the river Liffey before it reaches the Irish Sea.

Each kayak is fitted with a bin and tools for grabbing plastic bobbing on the water’s surface. Each bin is weighed after docking, and the waste is recycled.

Volunteers must then share their experience on social media to promote the initiative, see related link.

Click here to read more on the background of this initiative

Published in Kayaking

#irishports - New Ross Port is to be transferred to Wexford County Council within the coming months and will lead to great opportunities for the development of the quays area of the town.

As NewRoss Standard writes, this is the view of director of services for economic development with Wexford County Council, Tony Larkin who addressed the monthly meeting of New Ross Municipal District.

Mr Larkin said the 'bottom tier' ports in Ireland are being transferred to local authorities.

'It's New Ross' turn. We have been in negotiations with the Department of Transport for two years. We've been doing due diligence on the port company and I compliment the work of the port company.'

He said the company is being disbanded and will merge into the council.

Mr Larkin said the transfer could occur as soon as May or June, and would have already taken place if not for some cost issues involving the removal of the oil tanks on the quay and the cost of draining the Barrow.

For the transfer to take place three ministers have to sign the transfer letter.

For further reading on this development at the inland port click here.

Published in Irish Ports

The winter mooring period ends on Sunday 31 Mar 2019. Thereafter Navigation Bye-law No. 17(3) applies i.e. vessels should not berth in the same harbour for longer than the statutory period of 5 consecutive days nor more than a total of 7 days in any one month.

Published in Inland Waterways
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The winter mooring period has begun and with it a number of changes to the operation of Waterways Ireland’s moorings.

Winter mooring is available on Waterways Ireland moorings on the River Shannon for the 5 month period 1 November – 31 March for a fee of €63.50. For 2018-2019 bookings visit here

From the 7th November electricity and water to Waterways Ireland jetties, harbours and marinas will be turned off to reduce damage from winter weather including storms and freezing conditions. A Marina Notice will issue when both services are re-connected in 2019.

Over the winter Waterways Ireland advises boat owners to take additional precautions if visiting their vessels during any stormy weather and heavy rainfall. Slippery conditions and strong winds are a hazard when walking on floating pontoons and when moving boats. Certainly boat owners should consider wearing full personal protective equipment if it is deemed necessary to visit a vessel during stormy weather.

Boaters should also note the closure of Albert Lock and Athlone Lock for 6 weeks from the 5th and 12th November respectively for essential maintenance works and passage through the locks will not be possible during this time.

Waterways Ireland will continue to issue Marine Notices throughout the winter period to advise boaters of changes to navigation conditions. Marine Notices are published on the Waterways Ireland website.

Published in Inland Waterways
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boot Düsseldorf, the International Boat Show

With almost 250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair and every year in January the “meeting place" for the entire industry. Around 2,000 exhibitors present their interesting new products, attractive further developments and maritime equipment. This means that the complete market will be on site in Düsseldorf and will be inviting visitors on nine days of the fair to an exciting journey through the entire world of water sports in 17 exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology, equipment and accessories, services, canoes, kayaks, kitesurfing, rowing, diving, surfing, wakeboarding, windsurfing, SUP, fishing, maritime art, marinas, water sports facilities as well as beach resorts and charter, there is something for every water sports enthusiast.

boot Düsseldorf FAQs

boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair. Seventeen exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology.

The Fairground Düsseldorf. This massive Dusseldorf Exhibition Centre is strategically located between the River Rhine and the airport. It's about 20 minutes from the airport and 20 minutes from the city centre.

250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair.

The 2018 show was the golden jubilee of the show, so 2021 will be the 51st show.

Every year in January. In 2021 it will be 23-31 January.

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Messeplatz 40474 Düsseldorf Tel: +49 211 4560-01 Fax: +49 211 4560-668

The Irish marine trade has witnessed increasing numbers of Irish attendees at boot over the last few years as the 17-Hall show becomes more and more dominant in the European market and direct flights from Dublin offer the possibility of day trips to the river Rhine venue.

Boats & Yachts Engines, Engine parts Yacht Equipment Watersports Services Canoes, Kayaks, Rowing Waterski, Wakeboard, Kneeboard & Skimboard Jetski + Equipment & Services Diving, Surfing, Windsurfing, Kite Surfing & SUP Angling Maritime Art & Crafts Marinas & Watersports Infrastructure Beach Resorts Organisations, Authorities & Clubs

Over 1000 boats are on display.

©Afloat 2020

At A Glance – Boot Dusseldorf 

Organiser
Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz
40474 Düsseldorf
Tel: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668
Web: https://www.boot.com/

The first boats and yachts will once again be arriving in December via the Rhine.

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