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Displaying items by tag: Rib

The fascinating adventure of RIB skipper Sergio Davì continues alone in the most extreme and difficult part of his bid to complete an ‘Ice RIB Challenge’ from Palermo to New York.

Since his departure from Palermo about a month ago, Sergio Davi in his Nautilus Explorer RIB called to Dun Laoghaire and Belfast in July and has already covered more than 3,500 nautical miles of the 7,000 planned.

In recent weeks he reached the Faroe Islands, where he was a guest of the Torshavn Marina, and Iceland, where he was received by the Snarfari Marina of Reykjavik and representatives of the Peace Run of Iceland.

The stop in Reykjavik was important because, as scheduled, he carried out the second pit-stop by lifting up the boat, cleaning the hull, checking the engines with oil change and filters before continuing with the second half of the journey. 

Currently Davì, on board of his Nautilus Explorer, is sailing through the “Denmark Strait”, that’s to say the oceanic waters separating Iceland from Greenland.

At Tasiilaq (also known as Assamalik), first Greenlandic port of call, Sergio Davì is waited for by the Italian explorer Robert Peroni, who has crossed Greeland by foot several times. After Tasiilaq he will have a stop in the small town of Qaqortoq, south of Greenland, and then on to Canada.

Solo navigation involves many difficulties. It is very tiring both physically and mentally. It is impossible to be able to rest and there can be no distraction or loss of concentration. A hard test to which Davì seems to respond with excellent results.

The technical-logistic support offered by the partners of the Ice Rib Challenge is also fundamental: as we know Davì is carrying out this adventure on board a totally standard RIB (rigid inflatable boat) branded Nuova Jolly Marine model Prince 38cc, powered by two outboard engines Suzuki DF350A dual prop, with only few adjustments to make suitable the navigation at extreme latitudes. Thanks to the special nautical tent made by Toti (nautical upholstery) and the special pilot seats created by Besenzoni, the captain can face difficult sailing hours, sheltering from rain, wind and cold. Moreover, thanks to the use of Amphibious bags (dry equipment), all equipments and personal goods are protected from bad weather and temperature changes.

Published in RIBs
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Since his departure from Palermo about a month ago, Sergio Davi in his Nautilus Explorer RIB has already covered more than 2,500 nautical miles of the 7,000 planned to complete his ‘Ice RIB Challenge’ from Palermo to New York.

The long-distance veteran has already crossed the Bay of Biscay and been welcomed by the Port de Camaret-sur-Mer, on the west coast south of Brest, with his Nuova Jolly Prince 38cc inflatable boat, powered by two Suzuki DF350A outboards.

More recently, his departure from Lochboisdale in the Outer Hebrides of western Scotland has completed his round of stopovers in these isles supported by Suzuki GB, which saw Davi welcomed at Newlyn Harbour in Cornwall as well as by the Royal Irish Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire and Belfast Harbour Marina.

Nautilus Explorer RIB

His stop in Dublin Bay was particularly exciting as he was greeted on arrival in Dun Laoghaire by a representative of the Italian Embassy relaying the personal greeting of Ambassador Paolo Serpi, and journalist Concetto La Malfa from italvideonewstv.net, an Italian online magazine in Ireland. While in Dublin, Davi also met Ambarish Keenan, a representative of the Peace Run movement.

Yesterday the Nautilus Explorer was making good progress to Torshavn in the Faroe Islands, where it was expected yesterday evening (Saturday 27 July). This is a key refuelling stop before the big push across the far North Atlantic to Iceland.

The crossing will be an important test both for the boat and engines and also for the equipment that the captain has brought with him.

Keep up with Davi’s Ice RIB Challenge at his website www.ciuriciurimare.com or via social media, on Facebook at Sergio Davi Adventures and Instagram @sergiodavi_adventures. In addition you can search for ‘Sergio Davi’ in the iOS Ap Store and Google Play Store for the official app to follow in real time.

Published in RIBs

Cork Harbour had an impressive RIB visitor when a Zodiac Hurricane ZH-1300 MACH II OB Interceptor called to the south coast earlier this month writes Bob Bateman

The new model is the newest and largest platform of the Zodiac Hurricane range and had its world debut in 2017.

Spotted on board on her harbour tour was Crosshaven RNLI's James Fegan and his wife Caroline. 

Also invited onboard in Cork Harbour were members of Mallow Search and Rescue who, according to its Facebook page, travelled to the Harbour's Naval base for a demo day with Zodiac Milpro.

Dubbed the Interceptor, the ZH-1300 demo boat shows the nimble manoeuvrability normally associated with smaller craft and, say Zodiac, it addresses the needs of end users in the Military and Patrol boat market for larger platforms, with focus on speed, handling and stability.

Zodiac Hurricane 13m3This 13-metre platform is propelled by quad (4x) Mercury Verado 350 HP outboard engines

The boat is designed around an aluminium hull and deck and features the 'MACH 2' stepped-hull design.

Zodiac Hurricane 13m2The ZH-1300 OB is fitted with a dual console, featuring a pilot and navigator in the forward positions, and communication and team commander positions at the aft console, all with drop-down, shock-mitigation seating

Based on proven 9- and 11-meter MACH II hull models, the larger size allows for higher payloads and additional deck space, while providing superior seakeeping and higher speed capability in rough water conditions.

The patented Hybrid shaped collar features round sections at the bow and D-shape sections in the aft two-thirds, while the Durarib™ patented foam and air technology design provides exceptional strength and impact resistance. The collar is also equipped with an auto-inflation system and integrated dive door.

Published in RIBs
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A James Bond-style amphibious craft that uses four-wheel drive to enter and leave the sea will be making its European debut in North Wales.

The £220,000 AMP rib will be among the stars of the All Wales Boat and Leisure Show at the Anglesey Showground from Thursday, May 30, to Saturday, June 1.

It is being brought there by Pwllheli and Southampton-based Ideal Boat who have designed bespoke versions of the high-powered vessel with Ocean Craftmarine who specialise in making rigid inflatables for the military and law enforcement agencies worldwide.

Ideal Boat will also be showcasing some of their other impressive brands like Chaparral, Finnmaster, Husky, Robalo, Spectre and Capelli.

According to managing director Neville Williams, 44, who founded the company in 2012, they have been crowned international dealer of the year by American boat makers Chaparral every year since 2014.

He said: “Chaparral is a fantastic company. They are the biggest selling, number one sports boat brand in the UK & USA, and I am very proud that outside the USA we are their biggest and most successful dealer.

“This year we will be unveiling our new brand, AMP, which is a collaboration with Ocean Craftmarine. Their parent company Solico also produces 90 per cent of the world’s snowboards and wakeboards.

“They’re amphibious ribs with wheels on legs that drop down and they drive out of the sea and straight up the beach.

“Most of their marine products are made for the military and special services, as well as for navies worldwide.

“We gave them a specification and they have made different versions of the AMP for us, ranging in price from £156,000 to £300,000 including VAT.

“It’s a quality rigid inflatable boat with seating that can cope with bad seas if necessary and has an onboard 35 horsepower Vanguard engine as well as the 4wd hydraulic legs which enables you to drive on dry land. It’s very James Bond, it’s very glamorous and a lot of fun.

“The AMP will be making its first-ever appearance anywhere at the All Wales Boat and Leisure Show.

“Although they have not arrived in the country yet, I have a number of them already sold, so I am expecting them to be very popular.

He added: “The All Wales Boat and Leisure Show is a great event and the Anglesey Showground is the perfect location.

“It’s bang in the middle of Anglesey, its surrounded by holiday parks and the sea. That’s why people go there. You’ve got your audience there and it’s going to be the school holidays.”

Organiser Davina Carey-Evans, managing director of Beaumaris-based Sbarc Event Management, revealed the marine sector is growing faster in Wales than any other part of the UK and boating generates an annual tourism spend of £282 million.

Anglesey is also popular with surfers and scuba divers, who pump £7.8 million into the local economy.

Davina, who has previously been involved with marine events such as the One Ton Cup, a world-renowned sailing event which was based in Pwllheli in 2001 and the annual Round Anglesey Race, said: “The All-Wales Boat Show has evolved and grown and the 2019 event will also include a strong leisure element, with holiday parks like The Warren in Abersoch and Plas Coch on Anglesey being represented.

“Moving the show to Anglesey showground will hopefully be a catalyst for our plan to turn the island into a major events hub.

“We certainly have all the right ingredients. Anglesey is already a destination for 1.8 million visitors every year looking for things to see and do while, the venue is ideal, with 3000 square metres of undercover buildings, parking for 3,000 vehicles and excellent accessibility as it’s just off the A5 and A55.

“The show will connect together industry leaders in boat and leisure products and services across Wales, with not only fishing and boating enthusiasts but all those that have a passion for the great outdoors. T

“It will be a family friendly and an engaging event with the opportunity to discover a huge range of exhibitors, show events and activities where you can have a go too.

“The show will be a must-visit for event boat owners, watersport-lovers or families looking for a great day out and there is also a glamping site for those who want to stay overnight.”

The event also has the backing of Jim Jones, the managing director of North Wales Tourism.

He said: "Maritime tourism is on the up here because North Wales generally and Anglesey specifically has so much to offer. It's second to none.

“We already have fantastic attractions on the Menai Strait, including RibRide and the brilliant facilities at the National Outdoor Centre for Wales, Plas Menai, which excels in delivering the ultimate in water sports courses and outdoor adventure activities.

“North Wales is undoubtedly the European capital of adventure tourism and marine tourism is a big part of that.

“There is so much confidence in the industry, so much investment going into North Wales, and we're now reaping the rewards.

“The plan to stage the All-Wales Boat and Leisure Show at the Anglesey Showground heralds another economic boost for the region and underlines that we are now in a golden age for tourism.”

Published in Marine Trade
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South African Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) builder Gemini Marine has announced Berthon as its sole UK and Ireland dealer for its range of military, rescue, commercial and leisure RIBs.

Established in 1979, Gemini Marine designs and manufactures the most comprehensive range of cabin and open RIBs for many of the world’s military, rescue and commercial operators, as well as supplying RIBs into the leisure, expedition and adventure sectors. These customers all recognize the resilience, reliability and durability of Gemini RIBs in even the most extreme and dangerous operations.

“We are thrilled to be appointed to represent the Gemini RIB range in UK and Ireland. Berthon has long been involved in both the leisure and commercial boat market, and we are now offering the Gemini product to all our customers. With customisations which we will carry out in our Lymington shipyard, we can take a standard product and make it suit every customer’s unique requirements. Gemini’s comprehensive range of RIBs and inflatables neatly fills the gap in our product portfolio,” said Dominic May, Director of Berthon.

Published in Boat Sales
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#Record - Marc Lyne and Dean Watson have smashed the longstanding under-30ft Round Ireland powerboat record by almost half an hour, pending UIM ratification.

On Friday 13 July last the duo set a provisional time of 18 hours and 12 minutes — some 25 minutes faster than Philip Fitzgibbon and Mike Shanahan’s RIB record of 18:38:50 set in 2009.

And Lyne claims the time could have been more than two hours’ better “if we had not been beaten up for the last 40 miles from Cork to Crookhaven”.

While Team Hibernia set a sub-13-hour time with their wave-piercing powerboat in 2016, the record for under-30ft boats was still standing. And that’s the time on which Lyne and Watson put their sights after breaking the Round Anglesey time, in Watson’s home waters, back in 2015.

Over the next three years, the pair set about preparing their boat, a Scorpion 8.5m RIB dubbed Ocean Devil, to make the most of its Yanmar 315HP inboard engine.

“TheThe Scorpion 8.5m RIB Ocean Devil prepped and ready to go

That involved a series of main prop modifications, as well as the installation of new fuel tanks with 400 litres’ capacity in addition to the 363l main tank, all while still getting as close as possible to the RIB’s top speed of 51 knots without revving over 3,750 rpm.

A key element of their set-up was using gravity to tap into the main tank through the service hatch by the helm, to avoid the use of battery-sapping pumps adding unnecessary weight.

With 45 knots achievable when fully loaded, and the engine mount put through rigorous sea and wake trials in the Solent, the next step was to reduce the overall weight. That meant new batteries, courtesy of DMS Technologies, and replacing the heavy A-frame with a removable radar post and a carbon post for the VHF antenna.

Safety remained paramount in their modifications, with all navigation lights replaced by LEDs, a new radio with built-in AIS from Raymarine, and a full set of offshore flares.

With the new and improved Ocean Devil ready for action, what Lyne and Watson needed next was a winning strategy. Cue a consolation with Mike Deacon, a RIB speed record breaker in his own right, who offered a list of suggestions — the most important of which was to wait till the weather was just so.

“The reason he and David his son had never attempted the Ireland world record was that you had to get the weather exactly right, and that would mean having the boat in Ireland and ready to go at 24 hours’ notice,” Lyne says. “So really, the people best placed to attempt the record were already in Ireland.”

Fast forward to summer 2018 — the best experienced in Ireland for years — and all the pieces were in place for a record run.

“LyneCourse plotted: Lyne and Watson’s planned stages around the Irish coast

With the support of Denis Dillon at Irish Sailing, and Stena Line’s Fishguard-Rosslare ferry route, Lyne and Watson were soon in Skibbereen fuelling up ahead of their planned start in Crookhaven.

Dillon put the duo in touch with Justin McInerney, a previous Round Ireland record holder with Team Pulsar Racing, who would be their official timer on the day. His advice on the best stops to avoid busy slipways would prove crucial to their success.

With their boat and safety equipment checked over, and the passage plan forward to Ireland’s four main coastguard stations, Lyne and Watson made an early start at 4am on Friday 13 July.

That date would be true to its reputation as the duo rounded their first headland and ploughed headlong into a confused three-metre sea, halving their speed to 25 knots.

Thankfully that struggle was only for the first hour, and the rest of the day would prove to be an exceedingly lucky one, with flat seas and quick refuelling stops most of the way from Kerry to Portrush to Rosslare.

Spirits were high as the duo neared Cork late on Friday afternoon to complete their loop, only to run into that confused sea state once more — and a mishap on leaking hydraulic fluid that saw Watson bash his knee on top of a strained hip.

Lyne recalls of those dreaded final hours: “We can’t get any speed without getting hit hard occasionally which is taking its toll on both of us as we have been going for 16 hours. We duck behind the headlands, get some speed, then get beaten up as soon as we have to round the next headland.

“We remember to cut outside of all charted land as there are a few very small islands marked in some of the bays. We are losing a lot of time; rough calculations show us matching the current record – no!”

A little further on, and their situation improves: “I have the heading line on the plotter set to 12 miles, and can see the length of the line versus Fastnet Rock, which we are to round and then head towards Mizen Head,” Lyne remembers. “It’s three line lengths and we are down to 25 knots … that’s an hour and a half, that means we will equal the record.

“Dean moves to sit behind me so he can use his legs efficiently to cushion any impact without slipping.

“All good, we are on top of it now, back up to 35kt, then 40kt. The waves are getting smaller and more regular as we get to Fastnet Rock, round Fastnet, to finish at Mizen Head, torch in hand.

“Justin is on the radio: ‘Congratulations lads, you have done it.’”

Attempting and breaking this record “has taught me a few other things about life, boating and Ireland,” Lyne says, singling out Justin McInerney and “superstar” Denis Dillon for their assistance.

“I started a conversation with Denis over a year ago, and once he knew we were serious for July 13th, he did everything in his power to make it happen.”

McInerney, meanwhile, put in a call to Philip Fitzgibbon, one of the record holders Lyne and Watson have tentatively dethroned, to tempt a comeback challenge somewhere along the line.

As for Lyne and Watson’s trusty Ocean Devil, and how it fared from those 18 hours at sea? Nothing broken, though a handful seals need replacing — surprising little needed after so long flat out around the island of Ireland.

Besides Denis Dillon at Irish Sailing, and Justin and Antoinette McInerney, Lyne and Watson also expressed their tanks to Raymarine, DMS Technologies, Stena Line, BIBOA (Mike Deacon, Chris Strickland, Neil McGrigor), Claire at Marconi House in Crookhaven, and Mark at the Barleycove Beach Hotel near Mizen Head.

Published in Round Ireland Power

Baltimore Harbour's new landing pontoon and gangway to aid boating visitors and aquatic tourism are proving very popular as our photos by Michael Chester from the West Cork Harbour reveal.

RIBS have proliferated like chickweed around the coast over the last decade or so but finding a handy place to moor up is often a problem, not only in West Cork.

Baltimore's new handy facility makes it easier and safer to get afloat and moor boats overnight without the hassle of having to moor on a swinging mooring or retrieve boats from the water.

Baltimore Pontoon 0017The landing pontoon and gangway at Baltimore Harbour conveniently located close to the Sailing Club Photo: Michael Chester

But it wasn't always that easy. As Afloat.ie reported back in 2013, all that previously existed in Baltimore was a temporary floating pontoon for visiting boats present only in the summer season. That pontoon was capable of taking for up to seven or eight boats and was used by a mix of cruising boats, ribs and local fishing boats, often rafting up in busy periods.

In February 2015, a new landing pontoon and gangway to aid boating visitors and aquatic tourism were installed.

Nearby, there are now also new facilities at Cape Clear Island and works at Schull Harbour will further extend the cruising range for RIBs and pleasure boats to explore the boating wonders of the West Cork coast.

Build it and they will come!

Published in Irish Marinas
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We know that RIB crews and Instructors in our Junior Sailing Programmes are given the most rigorous training in safety writes W M Nixon. Yet over the years who hasn’t occasionally seen an outboard-driven RIB being treated as though it’s a toy, designed for playing harmless nautical chicken? But in reality any propellor – and an outboard propeller in particular – is probably the most lethal weapon with which you could possibly share the sea, even when it is being used responsibly with the best intentions.

So a report here in American Scuttlebutt will strike a chill in the hearts and minds of all thinking sailors. Put simply, a ten year old boy sailing pupil has been killed by an instructor’s RIB while taking part in a capsizing exercise. The story is here. It may have happened in America. But it is always lurking, ready to happen anywhere.

Published in RIBs
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The Coast Guard has recovered the bodies of two men from the water in Co Donegal yesterday. One man was in his 50s and the other man was in his 40s.

The incident occurred off Malinbeg, Glencolmcille, Co Donegal.

Whilst on exercise to Mullaghmore yesterday morning, the volunteer crew of the Bundoran RNLI Lifeboat responded to a pan-pan emergency call from Malin Head Coast Guard at 11.40am. A five metre RIB had been found at Malin Beg near Glencolmcille, County Donegal and one person was missing.

At around 12:15pm, the Bundoran Lifeboat began a shore search from Teelin towards Malin Beg Head. The Sligo based Rescue 118 helicopter was on scene at Malin Beg Head with the all-weather lifeboat from Arranmore also requested to launch. A shore crew from the Killybegs Coast Guard unit was also tasked.

Following notification from Rescue 118 that a casualty had been spotted in the water at Malin Mor, the lifeboat crew made their way to the scene and recovered a casualty just before 1pm.

The casualty was brought to Teelin Pier and transferred into the care of the emergency services where he was pronounced dead by a local doctor.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Dominic Daly auctioneer achieved good prices at the public auction of six RIBs at Kinsale Boat Yard, Co. Cork on Tuesday, 23rd May, 2017.

Daly told Afloat.ie the XS RIBs sold for €30,000 and €28000. The Redbay RIBs 6.5m sold for €14,000 13,500 and €8,700.

A Jet ski sold for €2000. 

Details of the boats are here

Published in RIBs
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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