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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Displaying items by tag: Rib

Both Portrush Lifeboats were in action on Saturday afternoon (15th October) to rescue four people in an overturned boat at the Barmouth at Portstewart.

Both boats were launched at 15.50 hours on a wet dark afternoon after reports had been received of an overturned rib. When the Inshore boat arrived on scene there was a heavy 2 metre swell. Three people were on top of the rib and one in the water.

The volunteer ILB crew got the person in the water into the lifeboat by which time the All-weather lifeboat was on scene. All persons were then transferred to the ALB and taken to Portrush.

All were wearing wetsuits and did not require medical attention.

Robin Cardwell LOM stated

'This was a perfect example of  team work between the two crews of the lifeboats from Portrush There was no hesitation in the volunteer crews responding to this shout. Each man knew what he had to do to bring the four people and their rib ashore'.

More from UK coastguard source here:

Six people have been rescued from a capsized dive boat at the entrance to the River Bann this afternoon.

Belfast Coastguard received a '999' call from a member of the public at 3:48 pm informing them that they had witnessed a small boat capsize and there were people in the water.  Coastguard Rescue Officers from Coleraine were sent to the scene. The Portrush inshore and all weather RNLI lifeboats were requested to launch and the Irish Coastguard rescue helicopter from Sligo was scrambled.

Steve Carson, Watch Manager, Belfast Coastguard, says:
"The inshore lifeboat was first on scene and discovered one person in the water and a further five people on the upturned hull of a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB). The conditions on scene were challenging with a large sea swell.
All six people have now been transferred to the all weather lifeboat and taken to Portrush Harbour and do not require further medical assistance.
The RHIB is being towed to harbour by the lifeboat.
We would like to remind the public that if they witness an incident along the shoreline or on the coast to ring '999' and ask for the Coastguard. Swift action from the member of the public this afternoon greatly assisted in the rescue of the six people in the water."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
14 teams have reached the final of the Yachtsman Insurance/ISA RIB Challenge. The competition promotes safety in power boating and it is aimed at training young crash boat drivers. The final round of the competition is being hosted by the National Yacht Club on October 22. The winning club will take home a generous first prize of a RIB rescue boat and 25hp outboard engine.
Published in RIBs
Tagged under

There's a new look to Red Bay Boats all new look 6. 5 metre RIB and by all accounts from this week's Southampton Boat Show the Irish built performance RIB is a real head turner.  They could've easily be dubbed the Show boat,  'Silver shadow' or then again 'White Lady' with her stunning tubes, stianless steel work, seating and white hull.

The Stormforce 650 is one of the most innovative RIBs produced by Redbay so far. The design came from a need for a standardised RIB of around 6.5 metres that could be built quicker and lighter in the County Antrim factory.

The 650 has one of the best handling hulls in its class, and we've seen her easily out-perform larger rival RIBs in rough weather. Although the basic hull is that of the Stormforce 6.5, the 650 features a redesigned bow and sheer line.

Red_Bay_6502

Master boat builder Tom McLaughlin was on the Southampton stand talking to Rib enthusiasts from across Ireland and the UK. The Red Bay name is now synonymous with heavy weather Ribbing and the boats have a reputation for their safety and comfort in big seas.

Red_Bay_6503

The 650 features a fully moulded internal deck. This gives a  a fresh clean appearance. It also makes it easy to maintain. The 650 features a standard 4 seater side by side console and bow locker. The deck can be either finished in a quality non-slip coating or as in the case of the Show boat above with an in tek-deck.

It is fitted with a 175hp Suzuki 4-stroke outboard, 4-seater console, Garmin 750s touchscreen chartplotter, Garmin 100i DSC VHF, teak-decking, LED navigation lights.

redbay6504

 

Published in RIBs
Tagged under
18 Redbay RIBs under the watchful eye of the firm's Tom McLaughlin headed out from Cushendall in Antrim trip to Islay in Scotland for their annual visit to Ardbeg Distillery on September 3rd.

Last year the fleet encountered stormy force eight conditions but this year the weather was kind and most of the Redbay fleet were soon tied up in calm conditions and the flotilla headed for the Old Kiln Cafe. Drams of Ardbeg waited on a table for everyone at the door. One boat didn't get there due to mechanical problems. It was towed into Rathlin Island and picked up on the way home.

A traditional music band played and after lunch the group was treated to a tour of the Distillery. A great day for this group of Northern Ribbers.

 

 

 

Published in RIBs
The public will have greater access to see shipping activity in the Port of Dublin, when a new boat-based tour of the country's busiest port starts tomorrow, writes Jehan Ashmore.
Titled the River Liffey & Port Tour, the 45-minute excursion is a partnership between Sea Safari Tours and the Dublin Port Company. Tours will operate from the pontoon where the M.V. Cill Airne floating river-restaurant and bar venue is berthed at the North Wall Quay. Cill Airne was built in the Liffey Dockyard nearly fifty years ago, where she forms part of the tours audio commentary covering the history and the present day.

In addition to cruising this stretch of the River Liffey alongside the 'Docklands' quarter, the tour RIB boat will pass downriver through the East-Link toll bridge where visitors will get closer views of the variety of vessels and calling cruise liners from other ports throughout the world.

There will be five daily tours beginning at 10.00am, 12.00pm, 2.00pm, 4.00pm and 6.00pm.Tickets cost €15.00 for adults, €12.50 for students and the charge for senior citizens and children is €10.00.

In addition Sea Safari operate a 'River Liffey' only tour, a Dublin Bay 'North' and 'South' tours which visit Howth Head, Baily Lighthouse, Ireland's Eye and to Dalkey Island and Killiney Bay, where both bay tours provide a chance to spot local marine wildlife of seals, porpoises and sea birds.

Published in Dublin Port

One of the best known RIB makes in the world, the Avon Searider, with hundreds in service with schools, clubs and commercial organisations around Ireland, and literally tens of thousands with similar organisations all over the world, has been treated to an upgrade and will now be sold as the Zodiac SeaRider.

Avon has been owned by Zodiac for many years now, but up until now, the two ranges were sold under separate brand names, and through separate distribution networks.

As part of a wider product integration programme, both ranges will now be sold exclusively through the Zodiac network, and under the Zodiac brand name.

This programme has already seen upgrades to the specification of the Zodiac Grand Raid range of inflatables, long established as the benchmark for commercial inflatable boats, as well as to the Avon W range of WorkBoats, now known as the Zodiac WB range of WorkBoats. These upgrades include even heavier Hypalon fabric, heavier duty standard equipment, new features fitted as standard, and a wider range of heavy duty consoles and seating.

The SeaRider range will continue to be built in the Avon factory in Llanelli, in Wales, as will the new WB series of WorkBoats, ERB Rescue Boats etc. They still offer the same outstanding performance, feature the same materials, and same "bulletproof" construction. The flooding bilge design provides ballast to make the SeaRider a stable platform while stationary at sea.

zodiac

This feature is a hallmark of the SeaRider range, and is indespensible to divers, port authorities, military and race managers alike. The photo above shows a prototype SeaRider 5.4m in mid air, with old style Avon fendering. The first models in the New Zodiac SeaRider livery are due in Ireland within the next 14 days, and they look really well with the dark grey hull and deck, grey tubes and extra wide heavy duty black fendering.

Zodiac SeaRiders will also be available to special order in the old Avon colour scheme of Grey tubes with Orange Hull and deck - this will involve a slightly longer lead time, but gives fleet owners the possibility of adding new boats to their fleet in the same colour scheme as existing boats. The new Zodiac MilPro catalogue, incorporating models from both Zodiac and Avon ranges will be available shortly. However, we wanted to bring this news to you as soon as possible and we will contact you again with more information in the near future.

The sole importer for Zodiac in Ireland is Western Marine in Dalkey, Co. Dublin.

Published in RIBs
People who live and work along the Northern Ireland coastline are being invited to help protect their community from crime as part of a national initiative supported by the Police Service of Northern Ireland.

Project Kraken is a UK-wide campaign which aims to increase vigilance along the coastline and encourage the community to work together to help combat any criminal or terrorist activity.

Inspector David Connery explains: "We're encouraging those living by the coast and members of the maritime community to look out for any suspicious activity and report it to the police immediately so that we can take action if necessary.

"Beaches, marinas and harbours can be uncomplicated points of entry into Northern Ireland and police rely on members of the public to make us aware of anything untoward.

"Please contact police immediately if you find:

Unusual boat movements late at night or early in the morning.
People being landed at unusual locations.
People not knowing about boat handling.
People with inadequate dress for sailing.
Boats moving around at night time with no navigational lighting.
RIBS being loaded / unloaded at unusual times.
RIBS being loaded / unloaded at unusual places.
Packages being transferred out at sea from larger boats.
Packages being transferred to waiting cars.
Strangers acting suspiciously within the marina.
Strangers wanting to hire boats.
Boats with extra fuel tanks.
Boats with above average crew for the size of boat.

"If you notice anything suspicious or unusual please never involve yourself or touch any suspicious packages. Make a note of any registration numbers, markings or descriptions, and call your local police on 0845 600 8000. If the situation requires an emergency response, call 999.

"If someone would prefer to provide information without giving their details, they can contact the independent charity Crimestoppers and speak to them anonymously on 0800 555 111," Inspector Connery added.

Police are also encouraging local boat owners to register their vessels with the PSNI Ports Unit. This means that in the event of a theft, the rightful owners of the boat can be identified more quickly. Forms can be found on www.psni.police.uk or please contact the PSNI Ports Unit on 0845 600 8000.

Published in Coastal Notes

The eighth annual Kinsale Rib Run in aid of the RNLI takes place between 5th and 8th May 2011 to Aberystwyth in Wales. The first general crew meeting will take place in the Trident Hotel on Wednesday 23rd March at 8pm. More HERE.

 

Published in RIBs

Gardai launched a full investigation into the weekend boating tragedy where two men died in Inishboffin harbour.The men were identified locally as former Mayo footballer, Ger Feeney, and businessman, Donal McEllin, both from Castlebar.

It is understood the pair left the island by small RIB to travel back to their motor cruiser some time after midnight on Saturday and are both thought to have been wearing lifejackets when they set out.

A second investigation is also to be carried out by officers of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB).

More here:

Ex-GAA star dies in double drowning tragedy off island

Two men drowned off Inishbofin

Castlebar in shock as Inishbofin victims are named

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Safety News


Rescue News from RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Coast Guard News from Ireland


Water Safety News from Ireland

Marine Casualty Investigation Board News

Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Belfast Coastguard spent two hours this evening trying to locate a missing RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat) after it was reported leaving Rathlin in very poor weather conditions with four people on board, HM Coastguard report.

Concern for the occupants of the 8 metre RIB was initially raised when it was reported that it had left Rathlin harbour at 6.00pm in adverse weather conditions.  Belfast Coastguard attempted to contact the vessel on VHF radio and mobile telephone but were unsuccessful.

Further enquiries yielded that the RIB was suspected to be heading to Bangor Harbour, and so Belfast Coastguard sent the Bangor Coastguard Rescue Team out to see if they could sight the vessel.  In the meantime, Belfast Coastguard intercepted a communication from the RIB to Clyde Coastguard, whom they had contacted to inform them that they were just entering Bangor Harbour, in line with their passage plans.

In order to ensure they had safely arrived, Belfast Coastguard completed a radar search for the vessel and discovered that the occupants of the RIB were incorrect about their location, and had in fact just entered Belfast Lough, 13 miles from where they thought they were.

Belfast Coastguard finally managed to make communication with the RIB and ensured that they had sufficient fuel to complete their journey to Bangor.  When the RIB arrived in Bangor they were met by the Bangor Coastguard Rescue Team who ensured they were safe and well and offered some safety advice.

Belfast Coastguard Watch Manager Alan Pritchard said:

"We became immediately concerned for the safety of the occupants of the RIB when we were informed that they were heading out in such poor weather conditions, and our worries increased when it became apparent that they had no idea of their position and began heading into the wrong port.  The occupants of the RIB are now safely ashore and although were not in need of medical assistance they were quite badly shaken from the experience as it transpires that they had been trying to reach Bangor for several hours.

When we are informed of incidents such as these it allows the Coastguard to play a proactive role in preventing a situation from worsening by monitoring a vessel's passage.  However, this could have all been prevented by the crew preparing for their journey, advising the Coastguard of their intentions and being aware of their own capabilities and weather conditions."

Published in Rescue
Page 8 of 9

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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