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Displaying items by tag: Kinsale Yacht Club

A Kinsale Yacht Club crew is reported safe after being rescued 80 miles off the coast of northwest Spain last night.

The Cork yacht 'Loa Zour', a Bavaria 40 type, under skipper Ger Grant departed Kinsale bound for La Coruna on June Bank Holiday Monday but appears ran into difficulties and were rescued by Galician Search and rescue teams last night.

KYC Commodore Dave O'Sullivan says he is relieved to hear this morning that all five crew are safe and he understands that they spent the night ashore in a Spanish hotel.

O'Sullivan described the crew and skipper as 'very experienced' and that they have 'extensive cruising experience'. He also said the boat was 'very well equipped' for such a voyage.

Northwest Spain has been experiencing strong winds during Storm Miguel.

Published in Kinsale
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With the Kinsale Yacht Club Fastnet Race safety inspection (WS Cat 3 with Liferaft) and last minute, adjustments complete, the ten boat fleet lined up for a 1400 HRS start last Saturday writes Dave O'Sullivan. It was a tough beat into a 24-knot breeze tacking in and out of the bays along the West Cork coastline to an all but invisible Fastnet Rock shrouded in mist.

Conor Doyle's Freya rounded at 2330 HRS with EOS next at 0102 HRS followed by Finbarr O’Regan's Artful Dodger at 0215 HRS.

The offwind leg back to Kinsale involved many gybes as boats sought the advantage by playing the angles and dodging the westbound tide.

Freya finished at 0604 HRS followed by EOS at 0750 HRS and Artful Dodger at 0912 HRS. Waterford visitor the Albin Ballad Seven Whistler sailed brilliantly and finished at 1136 HRS.

Kinsale Marina was a sleepy place on Sunday afternoon with all the worn out sailors catching up on lost sleep.

The results, announced Wednesday evening after sailing, are as follows -

  1. EOS (C. McCarthy) KYC - Minihan Trophy
  2. Seven Whistler (R. Wubben) WHSC - Fastnet Trophy (for Visitors)
  3. 3. Artful Dodger (C. O’Regan) KYC
  4. Cara (F. Doyle) RCYC
  5. Freya (C. Doyle) KYC
  6. Flyover (D. Marchant) WHSC
  7. Siboney (J. Stallard) KYC
  8. Chancer (R.Carroll) KYC
  9. Blue Oyster (D. Coleman) SHSC 
  10.  Reavra Too (S. Lysaght) KYC
Published in Kinsale
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Minister for State at the Department of Health Jim Daly launched the Watersports Inclusion Games 2019 at Kinsale Yacht Club writes Bob Bateman. The event, set to take place in Kinsale harbour and environs on 24th and 25th August, is a landmark event celebrating watersports for people of all abilities from the physical, sensory, intellectual and learning spectrums, and of all ages and demographics. The games were launched with Bryan Dobson of RTE as Master of Ceremonies together with Event Ambassadors; 11 time Paralympian Sailor John Twomey, World Para-Sailor Gina Griffin, along with Special Olympian Kayaker Oisin Feery.

Following the overwhelming success of the event in Dun Laoghaire 2017 and Galway 2018 (scooping Project of the Year at the 2018 CARA National Inclusion Awards), this year’s event, hosted by Kinsale Yacht Club, will take place at several locations around Kinsale including the main harbour and marina, Castlepark beach and Garretstown beach. There will be sailing, kayaking, canoeing, rowing, surfing, water skiing and fast boat rides on offer and 200+ participants are expected to take part across the weekend.

KInsale Watersport inclusion1The games were launched with Bryan Dobson of RTE as Master of Ceremonies together with Event Ambassadors; 11 time Paralympian Sailor John Twomey, World Para-Sailor Gina Griffin, along with Special Olympian Kayaker Oisin Feery Photo: Bob Bateman

This is a national event which aims to showcase the best of Irish inclusive watersports practice and facilitation and is organised by Irish Sailing in association with Canoeing Ireland, Rowing Ireland and Cork Local Sports Partnership along with Kinsale Yacht Club Sailability and Kinsale Outdoor Education Centre. The event is supported with activities by Spinal Injuries Ireland, Irish Waterski and Wakeboard Federation and Surf 2 Heal, in addition to those of the National Governing Bodies involved. Offering further support are numerous local and national organisations including Sailing into Wellness, Sail Training Ireland, Special Olympics Ireland, and clubs and training centres from around the country who will support the event with resources, volunteers, instructors and facilitators.

The games, as a landmark occasion rounding up the summer watersports calendar, is the product of ongoing inclusion trainings and awareness drives being activated by the organising bodies in line with Sport Ireland’s Policy on Participation in sport by People with Disabilities and is enabled by grant funding from Sport Ireland Dormant Accounts Sports Inclusion Fund.

Speaking at the launch, 11 time Paralympian John Twomey said: ’I am delighted to be here to help launch the third annual Watersports Inclusion Games. It is events such as this, that will help to inspire people of all abilities to take part in watersports activity and perhaps even one day compete for Ireland in Paralympic sport.’

Harry Hermon, Chief Executive of Irish Sailing spoke at the launch, stating: ‘Now in its third year, the Inclusion Games is already becoming an annual landmark occasion, celebrating inclusive watersports activity. By raising national awareness of inclusive opportunities, and encouraging more watersports providers to adopt an equal-access approach to watersports delivery, we aim to perpetuate a culture of inclusive best-practice throughout watersports.’

Photo Gallery By Bob Bateman

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Published in Kinsale
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‘O, to be in Kinsale Now that April's there’ to paraphrase the poet. A true wind, a flat sea and a warm sun reminded the combined fleet of the Matthews Helly Hansen sponsored Kinsale Yacht Club Spring Series of the reason we love to race sailboats writes Dave O'Sullivan.

Race Officer Donal Hayes took hold of the opportunity and laid two tough courses stretching the width of the outer harbour from Preghane to Hole Open. Long hard beats were followed by giddy kite rides and all accompanied by the smell of Factor 50.

Starts were hard fought and praise must go to the nerves of the committee boat, White Tiger, who looked like they were to be joined in the cockpit by Finny O’Regan’s ‘Artful Dodger’ and crew. But it was one of those days where bad things didn’t happen and with the briefest kiss she was gone.

The big boys of racing stayed in last week’s position with Nieulargo leading Jump Juice leading Meridian.

Freya kinsaleFreya in upwind mode. Photo: Donal Hayes

Another victory for the RCYC in class 1 with Bad Company winning both handicaps. A boat for the future here is surely Brian Jones’ Jelly Baby. She loved today’s conditions and landed two bullets with time to spare.

Again a popular victory in both Class 2 categories, with Waterford sailors Fulmar Fever and Flyover edging past local favourites ‘Diamond’ with the sponsor James Matthews at the helm.

No waiting for Godot in the white sail fleet as she romped home without any real competition. When a boats discard is a second place, you know they are good.

It’s back to club racing now in KYC and the next big event in the cruisers calendar is the Fastnet race on Saturday 25th May and of course the Sovereigns Cup 26th/29th June. And, if today is anything to go by, it is time to buy shares in Factor 50.

Overall results of the Matthews Helly Hansen Spring Series.

Class Zero IRC & ECHO

1. Nieulargo - D. Murphy

2. Jump Juice - C. Phelan

3. Meridian - T. Roche

Class One IRC

1. Bad Company - F. Desmond

2. Justus - D. Buckley

2. Coracle VI - K. Collins

Class One ECHO

1. Bad Company - F. Desmond

2. Justus - D. Buckley

2. Jelly Baby - K. Collins

Class Two IRC

1. Flyover - D. Marchant

2. Diamond - J. Matthews

3. Fulmar Fever - R. Marchant

Class Two ECHO

1. Fulmar Fever - R. Marchant

2. Diamond - J. Matthews

3. Flyover - D. Marchant

White Sail IRC & ECHO

1. Godot - J. Godkin

2. Gunsmoke II - S. Cohen

3. Miss Charlie - P. Beckett

Published in Kinsale
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Kinsale in the summertime…..If you set out to create the dream harbour as the perfect location for a regatta which captures the essence of the many pleasures of sailing and racing on Ireland’s south coast, then you’d end up with somewhere very like Kinsale writes W M Nixon. The characterful and hospitable old town climbs picturesquely above the bustling facilities-blessed waterfront, complete with its friendly yacht club. It makes for the ideal setting for the biennial Sovereign’s Cup, sponsored again by O’Leary Life, with the dates for 2019 being Wednesday June 26th to Saturday June 29th).

The impressive larger craft at the head of the cruiser-racer divisions inevitably draw the eye, with a distinct X-factor at the top of the fleet where Conor Doyle’s impressive XP 50 Freya will sail for the honour of the home fleet against such challengers as George Sisk’s new-acquired XP 44 WOW from Dun Laoghaire, and Robert Rendell’s XC 45 Samatoma from Howth - all of them electing to race with the Coastal Fleet.

X-Yachts of Denmark have a good track record at the Sovereign's, as main trophy winners in times past such as the Gore-Grimes family’s X-302 Dux from Howth will be very much in the fray, in against craft like D-Tox and Alpaca in 2019, while their club mates from the north Dublin port’s noted Half Ton Classics flotilla will be strongly represented, as will the popular J/109s from several different ports.

For those who prefer their racing at a slightly less high-powered level, the attractive racing waters between the Old Head of Kinsale and the Sovereign’s Islands off Oysterhaven will be the location for the White Sail Fleet, while nearby the race areas of the International Dragons and the International 1720s will be seeing some very intense sport.

In its early years, the Sovereign’s Cup was very much a cruiser-racer event. But the revival in popularity of the 1702 Sportsboats - and this year’s 90th Anniversary of the ever-young International Dragons - makes the addition of these rather special One-Designs seem like an appropriate and invigorating spicing-up of the Sovereign’s Cup 2019.

Early Bird 2 Closing date is April 26th so enter here

Published in Sovereign's Cup

"Men Plan, God Laughs", a proverb well illustrated this afternoon in Kinsale when the elements stole away a racing mark and forced RO Donal Hayes to abandon the race and start all over in the Kinsale Yacht Club Matthews Helly Hansen sponsored Spring Series writes Dave O'Sullivan.

The four classes returned to the start line as a substitute mark was laid and the day resumed. Winds were considerably stronger than forecast and the Eastern direction made conditions quite challenging but the Spring sunshine made it a thoroughly enjoyable outing.

Scroll down for photo gallery by Bob Bateman below

Kinsale Yacht club sailing1In Conor Phelan's absence, Prof O'Connell skippered Jump Juice Photo: Bob Bateman

Class 0 and 1 saw the honours go to Jump Juice and Jelly Baby, respectively, on both IRC and Echo. James Matthews (event sponsor) was first in Class 2 (IRC and Echo) and the stalwarts on Godot romped home in both handicaps in White Sails. Godkin & Co. now have three bullets and look pretty unassailable in White Sails. James Matthews and Co. appear to have class 2 wrapped.

Kinsale Yacht club sailing1Conditions were glorious - 10-12 knots of southeasterly breeze and sunshine Photo: Bob Bateman

Zero and 1 are still anybody’s to win with two races left.

If you are planning on winning it is well worth remembering, Men Plan, God Laughs.

All to plan for next week with first gun at 1155 HRS.

Overall Positions...

Class Zero IRC & ECHO

1. Nieulargo - D. Murphy
2. Jump Juice - C Phelan
3. Freya - C. Doyle

Class One IRC & ECHO

1. Justus - D. Buckley
2. Coracle VI - K. Collins
3. Bad Company - F. Desmond

Class Two IRC & ECHO

1. Diamond - J. Matthews
2. Flyover - D. Marchant
3. Fulmar Fever - R. Marchant

White Sail IRC & ECHO

1. Godot - J. Godkin
2. Gunsmoke II - S. Cohen
3. Miss Charlie - P. Beckett

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Published in Kinsale
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East and South East winds gusting to over 40-knots led to the cancellation of this morning's third round of Kinsale Yacht Club's Mathews Centre Spring cruiser League where Denis Murphy's Nieulargo (pictured above) leads class one in IRC and ECHO divisions in a combined 26-boat fleet. 

Racing is scheduled again for next weekend. Read Afloat.ie's race reports here.

Published in Kinsale
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Kinsale Yacht Club Marina is a hive of activity today as repairs are underway to damage sustained during the gruelling two races of the Matthews Helly Hansen series last Sunday as previously reported by Afloat here. As sails are being taken away for repair thoughts turn to the lightly runners and riders next Sunday (14th) writes KYC Commodore Dave O'Sullivan.

This is the first event using the new class bands (Class Zero > 1.020, Class One 0.930 to 1.019 and Class Two < 0.929) which are now in force for all SCORA events on the South Coast and while we have last Sunday’s results to go on, the fleets have yet to settle.

Kinsale Yacht club league27Denis Murphy’s Grand Soleil Nieulargo Photo: Bob Bateman

In Class Zero Denis Murphy’s Grand Soleil Nieulargo is in flying form scoring two firsts in both handicap systems. The lift in their IRC Handicap caused by the larger Jib and Spinnaker appears to have been well worth it. Conor Phelan’s evergreen Jump Juice scored two seconds in both handicaps and with a crack crew on board looks more than capable of unsettling things next weekend. Conor Doyle's Freya is lying third and has yet to find form but everybody knows that this XP50 is very fast when she gets into her stride. Tom Roche of (very polished) Meridian, who had to retire from the second race due to a broken a mainsheet block, tells us that he will be ready to go once again next Sunday.

Kinsale Yacht club league12Tom Roche's Meridian Photo: Bob Bateman

Kinsale Yacht club league36Class one yachts in Sunday's race Photo: Bob Bateman

In Class One a protest hearing is pending between Artful Dodger and Bad Company and the outcome could have an impact on the overall positions. Dan Buckley’s Justus is going well with a third on IRC and first in ECHO. Kieran Collins aboard Coracle VI suffered a setback due to being OCS in the second race. This boat is in very good form and is one to watch. Brian Jones’s J109 Jelly Baby did not compete due to gear failure but will be in the mix next Sunday as will Cian McCarthy on EOS, Tony & Alice Kingston on Luv Is and Stephen Lysaght sailing Reavra. Ronan Downing’s Miss Whiplash is launched and ready to go, she is also one to watch next Sunday.

Kinsale Yacht club league41Cian McCarthy's EOS Photo: Bob Bateman

In Class Two David Marchant’s Sigma 33 Flyover is lying first in both IRC and ECHO with James Matthew’s Diamond second in both. Robert Marchant’s Fulmar Fever was third in both races. It’s far too soon to make a call here as Diamond will find form in lighter winds, Fulmar Fever has yet to sparkle and Padraig O’Donovan’s Chameleon missed out on race two.

The eight–boat White Sail fleet looks to be dominated by John Godkin (Godot), Sammy Cohen (Gunsmoke) and Sean O’Riordan (Y Dream) who are 1st, 2nd and 3rd overall. Make a prediction at your peril as Batt O’Leary (Sweet Dreams), Nigel Dan (Valkriss,) Dave Ackerlind (Paragon) and Patrick Beckett (Miss Charlie) are very competitive and yet to shine.

As always in the Spring Series, boats are being launched every day and we may well be in for a surprise yet.

First Gun on Sunday is at 1155 HRS.

Published in Kinsale
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Kinsale Yacht Club's Matthews Centre and Helly Hansen Spring Series is led by Denis Murphy's Nieulargo on IRC and ECHO after today's first race in breeze writes Dave O'Sullivan.

The committee boat, White Tiger, anchored with difficulty just south of Bulman and race officer Denis Kieran (with helpers T. O’Brien, G. Kieran, S. Keane Hopcraft, S. Horgan and G. Noonan) got the twenty-nine boat fleet off into a boisterous east breeze to Sovereign followed by a leeward leg to Hake and Sandy Cove. After two gruelling laps, competitors were finished near Bulman by mark boat Big Blue (C. Clarke and D. Boyd).

Kinsale Yacht club league1Nieulargo Denis Murphy Photo: Bob Bateman
The second race started at Charles Fort sending the fleets round Bulman once again to Sovereign with a long off wind leg and two laps of Sandy Cove & Bulman. The finish was also at Charles Fort.

Kinsale Yacht club league1

The east breeze strengthened all day leading to rough conditions and some thrills and spills. All boats were back on the marina at 1600 HRS.

It all starts again next Sunday (14th April) at 1155 HRS. 

Scroll down below for photo gallery by Bob Bateman

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Results...

Class Zero ECHO & IRC

1. Nieulargo - D. Murphy
2. Jump Juice - C Phelan
3. Freya - C. Doyle

Class One IRC

1. Artful Dodger - F. O'Regan
2. Bad Company - F. Desmond
3. Just Us - D. Buckley

Class One ECHO

1. Just Us - D. Buckley
2. Artful Dodger - F. O'Regan
3. Bad Company - F. Desmond

Class Two IRC and ECHO

1. Flyover - D. Marchant
2. Diamond - J. Matthews
3. Fulmar Fever - R. Marchant

White Sail IRC and ECHO

1. Godot - J. Godkin
2. Gunsmoke - S. Cohen
3. Y Dream - S. O'Riordan 

Published in Kinsale
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The final race of the Frank Godsell sponsored March League took place in gentle spring conditions in Kinsale Yacht Club writes Commodore Dave O’Sullivan.

For the third week in a row, the weather favoured the lighter boats and James Matthews and his crew on Diamond were in winning form. They won on both ECHO and IRC and were followed in both by Stephen Lysaght's Too and Class Captain Cian McCarthy's EOS.

Meanwhile, in White Sails David Hanly and his band of raiders from the RCYC onboard Fast Buck, made it look easy, romping home in front of Y Dream and Miss Charlie.

The generosity of Frank's sponsorship is renowned and the bar talk afterwards was whether or not this was his 40th year sponsoring the March League. To be certain, it was agreed to celebrate the 40-year event this year and the next two years!

Results…

Spinnaker IRC & ECHO

1. Diamond (J. Matthews)
2. Reavra Too (S. Lysaght)
3. EOS (C. McCarthy)

White sail

1. Fast Buck (D.J. Hanley)
2. Y Dream (S. O’Riordan)
3. Miss Charlie (P. Beckett)

All sailors are reminded that the Matthews/Helly Hansen sponsored Spring Series starts next Sunday 7th April with the warning signal at 1155 HRS.

Published in Kinsale
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Page 7 of 20

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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